The Morris and Anita Broad Research Fellowship Awards

SIPA Announces Recipients of the Morris and Anita Broad Research Fellowship Awards for 2011-2012

The School of International and Public Affairs (SIPA) is pleased to announce the recipients of the Morris and Anita Broad Research Fellowship Awards for 2011-2012. The competition for research scholarship awards is open to junior tenure-earning faculty members as well as advanced doctoral students (ABD level—those who have passed comprehensive exams and have successfully defended the dissertation prospectus) in one of the SIPA departments or programs. The newly established Broad Fellowship Awards are made possible through a generous gift from Morris and Anita Broad. Selected Fellows receive funding that can be used for fieldwork or archival research; the purchase of supplies such as computer hardware, software, and books; and conference travel in support of their scholarship.

The purpose of the fellowship is to provide FIU faculty members and doctoral students at early stages in their careers with an opportunity to supplement other resources for enhancing their research so that they will be better able to complete their manuscripts, grant proposals or dissertations. Faculty may receive awards of up to $1,000 and doctoral candidates may receive up to $750

Faculty Recipients

Whitney A. Bauman, Ph.D., is assistant professor of Religious Studies. Dr. Bauman received a Broad Research Fellowship to support travel to Indonesia, where she is conducting research for her project Religion, Nature, and Globalization: Toward Planetary Identities, which will culminate in her second, single-authored manuscript.

Juliet S. Erazo, Ph.D., is assistant professor of Anthropology in the Department of Global and Sociocultural Studies. Dr. Erazo received a Broad Research Fellowship to support travel to Ecuador, where she will continue research for her studies of climate mitigation in Ecuadorian indigenous territories. This award will assist Professor Erazo in completing her manuscript entitled Governing Indigenous Territories: Property, Progress, and Empowerment in the Ecuadorian Amazon.

Vrushali Patil, Ph.D., is assistant professor of Sociology, holding a joint appointment in the Department of Global and Sociocultural Studies and the Women’s Studies Center. With her Broad Research Fellowship award Dr. Patil will conduct research at the London-based British Library via their collection, the India Office Records and Private Papers. Professor Patil’s project is entitled The Historical Impact of British Colonialism on Gender Relations in India.

Markus Thiel, Ph.D., is assistant professor of International Studies in the Department of Politics and International Relations. The Broad Research Fellowship award will provide conference travel support for Dr. Thiel to present his research on non-governmental organizations, human rights, and participatory governance in the European Union, contributing to the completion of his book manuscript tentatively entitled Civil Society and Human Rights Promotion in the European Union.

Chantalle F. Verna, Ph.D., is assistant professor of History and International Relations. Dr. Verna received a Broad Research Fellowship to support her project entitled Haiti and the World: New Narratives through the Study of Haitian Experts in Africa, 1958-71. This travel award will provide the means for Professor Verna to analyze primary source documents from the 1950s through 1970s, specifically focusing on the Maurice Dartigue Papers at the Schomburg Research Center for Black Culture and the United Nations in New York City.

Jue Wang, Ph.D., is assistant professor of Public Policy in the Department of Public Administration. With the support provided by his Broad Research Fellowship Dr. Wang will continue his study of research and development (R&D) activities in start-up firms and the relationship between R&D investments and market success. Funding will allow Dr. Wang to access the Kauffman Firm Survey databank, whose confidential microdata on approximately 5,000 start-up businesses is accessible only through the University of Chicago NORC Data Enclave.

Albert Wuaku, Ph.D., is assistant professor of African and African Diaspora Religions in the Department of Religious Studies. Dr. Wuaku received a Broad Research Fellowship to support his project entitled Mambos, Houngas and the community’s health in the diaspora: A study of Vodou’s role in community re-grouping and the dispensation of health among Haitian immigrants in Miami. This project will culminate in Dr. Wuaku’s second monograph addressing topics within his broader research interests on African agency in the global circulation of religion.

Jin Zeng, Ph.D., is assistant professor of Comparative Politics and International Relations in the Department of Politics and International Relations. With the support provided by his Broad Research Fellowship Dr. Zeng will continue his study of the initiation, implementation, and dynamics of privatization in urban China at the local level, culminating in a book manuscript. Conference travel support will assist Dr. Zeng in disseminating his research.

Advanced Doctoral Candidate Recipients

Mayurakshi Chaudhuri is a fourth year doctoral candidate in Sociocultural Anthropology, in the Department of Global and Sociocultural Studies, working under the direction of major professor Dr. Sarah J. Mahler. Ms. Chaudhuri’s proposed dissertation title is Gendered ties in motion: U.S.-based transnational Asian Indians’ negotiation of spousal and family relations. The Broad Research Fellowship award will provide partial funding for Ms. Chaudhuri to travel to India to conduct fieldwork in support of her study.

Daniel Clausen is a third year Ph.D. candidate in International Relations, working under the direction of major professor Dr. Paul Kowert, in the Department of Politics and International Relations. Mr. Clausen’s Broad Research Fellowship award will provide support for him to travel to Tokyo, Japan, to conduct dissertation research at the Keio University Library and the Diet National Library (Kokuritsukokkai Toshyokan) on the administration of three different prime ministers and the evolving relationship between the prime ministers and other actors involved in Japanese defense policy formation.

Donna A. Comrie is a third year Ph.D. candidate in Public Affairs. Under the direction of major professor Dr. Sukumar Ganapati, in the Department of Public Administration, Ms. Comrie is studying the impact of the Hope VI New Urbanism model, an approach that combines federally-funded efforts to revitalize public housing and the new urban planning and design movement. The Broad Research Fellowship will provide support for Ms. Comrie to use both quantitative and qualitative methods to investigate the influence that Hope VI public housing has on public schools, enrollment patterns, and neighborhoods.

Paula A. de la Cruz-Fernandez is a Ph.D. candidate in Atlantic History, working jointly with Dr. Ken Lipartito and Dr. Aurora Morcillo in the Department of History. Ms. de la Cruz-Fernandez received a Broad Research Fellowship award to partially fund travel to Mexico City and to Madrid, Spain, where she will continue fieldwork for her project entitled, Stitching the Atlantic: the Singer Sewing Machine Co. in Spain and Mexico, 1860-1940. Prior to receiving this award, Ms. de la Cruz-Fernandez conducted preliminary research for her project at the Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, WI), where the Singer business records are held.

Rebecca Garvoille is a 4th year Ph.D. candidate in Anthropology, working with major professor and cultural anthropologist Dr. Laura Ogden, in the Department of Global and Sociocultural Studies. With travel support from the Broad Research Fellowship award that she received, Mr. Garvoille will conduct archival research at the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) in College Park, MD, focusing specifically on records of the Bureau of Indian Affairs and the National Park Service. Ms. Garvoille’s dissertation research focuses on the history of social relations between Everglades National Park and the Miccosukee peoples.

Charles Lee Heck is a Ph.D. candidate in Social Geography, in the Department of Global and Sociocultural Studies, where he is working with major professor Dr. Roderick Neumann. With support from the Broad Research Fellowship that he received, Mr. Heck will travel to Brazil to continue his fieldwork on the community police program to urbanize the slums (favelas) in Rio de Janeiro.

Michelle Munroe is Ph.D. candidate in Political Science, working with major professor Dr. John Stack, in the Department of Politics and International Relations. Ms. Monroe’s dissertation is entitled The Transnationalization of Garrisons and their Effect on the Jamaican State. She will use the funding provided by the Broad Research Fellowship to conduct field research and archival data collection in Kingston, Jamaica.

Tekla Nicholas is a Ph.D. candidate in Comparative Sociology, working with major professor Dr. Alex Stepick, in the Department of Global and Sociocultural Studies. With support from the Broad Research Fellowship award that she received, Ms. Nicholas will conduct research on the transnational and intergenerational strategies of immigrant families from Haiti who settled in South Florida since the 1970s. This research will culminate in her dissertation entitled Out of the box: A transnational approach to the incorporation of Haitian immigrants to South Florida.

Francesco V. Ortoleva is a Ph.D. candidate in International Relations, working with major professor Dr. Paul Kowert, in the Department of Politics and International Relations. With his Broad Research Fellowship award Mr. Ortoleva will conduct fieldwork in four cities in Europe, to complete his comparative study of the European Union’s foreign and security policies in relation to: Russia, Iran, and Central Asia. This fieldwork will supplement the archival research already conducted.

Svetlana Tyutina is a Ph.D. candidate in Latin American and Spanish Literature, working with professors Camayd-Freixas, Watson, Torres-Pou, and Boutaghou in the Department of Modern Languages. Ms. Tyutina’s dissertation is entitled Hispanic Orientalism: the Literary Development of a Cultural Paradigm, from Medieval Spain to Modern Latin America. With support from the Broad Research Fellowship that she received Ms. Tyutina will conduct archival research at the National Library of Spain in Madrid.

Maria Carolina Zumaglini is a Ph.D. candidate in History, working under the direction of major professor Dr. Mark Szuchman, on a dissertation entitled, Nineteenth-Century Atlantic Educational Ideas and National Responses: A Comparative Study of the Public School in Boston, Buenos Aires, and Montevideo. With her Broad Research Fellowship award Ms. Zumaglini will conduct research at the Massachusetts Historical Society, the Gutman Library, City of Boston Archives, and the Board of Education Archives in Boston, to supplement research already conducted in Buenos Aires and Montevideo.

Click here to view a printable version>